RE Museum - HOW A JET ENGINE WORKS

Air is drawn into the engine and compressed by fans before entering the combustion chamber. It is then sprayed with fuel and ignited, creating a blast of hot gases. In the turbofan engine shown, the large fan passes extra air around the engine for more efficiency and less noise.

The high-speed stream of hot gases is expelled rearwards, and the reaction thrusts the aeroplane in the opposite direction.

Controlling an aeroplane

To change direction, a pilot uses a control column and foot pedals to alter the position of movable flaps on the wings and tail.
TAKE OFF CONTROLS
An aeroplane wing has movable slats at the front and flaps at the rear. They are closed in normal flight.
At low speed, opening the front slats and extending the rear flaps adds to the wing area and increases lift.
Air is channelled through the slots between the wing and the opened parts. This helps lift.

LANDING CONTROLS
Raised spoilers and extended rear flaps break the airflow and increase drag to slow the plane.